Which linux distro on a macbook pro?


#1

Hi guys. Yeah, I apologize if you’ve seen similar “which distro?” threads 928342723 times :slight_smile: :wink: :smiley: :mad: :frowning: :eek: :cool: :rolleyes: :stuck_out_tongue: :o :confused: :expressionless: ;D but anyways assuming you’re still reading, I’m looking for a distro to install on my MacBook Pro (8,1, love off if you’re judging me based on what I have; and also I’m not going to get rid of it; this will be my main computer for some time (P.S: I didn’t buy it so love off if you were going to hold any presumptuous attitudes about that)). I was looking especially at either Mint or Arch (both with XFCE, both of which I have already installed on my 10yo HP and netbook respectively). Both of these computers are also generally not my top choices for general computer use, hence my decision to install Linux on my MBP. :slight_smile:

I’ve been recommended several distros by various IRCers, including: Ubuntu, Mint, Debian, Fedora, and of course, Arch :), most of which I have heard positive reviews as of installation and general usage on the Mac (not Fedora :(). I’m fine with working in a terminal environment without a GUI so it doesn’t scare me too much, but generally I want a distro with abundant information on other users’ experiences with their distros on the MBPs.

The main thing I’m worried about is bootloaders. :confused: I approach most of them with abnormal trepidation and I’m afraid that if I do something wrong, my Mac will be unbootable. Something known to be reliable would be great. ;D

Another concern that I have is reinstallation. I’m having this computer until I graduate senior year (about a little over a year) and I don’t want to constantly reinstall every six months for new releases like Ubuntu and Mint (with the exception of LMDE which might also be a possibility if I hear more positive reviews of Debian on MBPs) do and not be outdated. Arch, a rolling release, seems great for this if it doesn’t break down (hue hue hue).

So as of now, Mint and Arch seem to be the best, with Arch having an excellent and superior wiki (for MBPs) and Mint having good driver support (in addition to being bloated, but who cares? love that LOL :D), so I’ll most likely choose one of them. However, the Arch wiki pages for MBP is pretty scattered and unspecific (or it was me reading them at a bad time) and I’m worried about corrupting my computer (I use it for school purposes, and P.S: I’m scared of partitioning incorrectly). And as most of you know about general hardware incompatibility of most distros on the MBP (let me rephrase that: “compatibility” with 999 configuration changes required), I don’t want to be spending too much time just setting it up to make it work (especially when it doesn’t work). I would favor something that I can set up without too much hassle (but if it’s in moderation it’s more than fine!).

Sorry for my exceptional usage of parenthetical remarks. Opinions (and especially personal experience) are more than appreciated.


#2

I go with something Ubuntu-based on everything I own. You know that you don’t have to re-install when a new ubuntu release comes out right? You just upgrade. I generally find myself using the LTS releases, which are supported for 2 years, unless my hardware can benefit from some new feature in a newer version. Right now all my desktops, media centers, laptops, and servers are running Ubuntu 12.04 LTS. My computers use the Kubuntu variant because I like KDE, but I also really like LXDE which comes with Lubuntu as well, over Xfce (which comes with Xubuntu, if you want that). They are all ubuntu and you can install all the different window managers and choose between them at login if you want.

Arch, being a rolling release, also means it’s not stable. It’s fine if you have the time to fix things after you upgrade now and then, but if you want a stable system, go with Ubuntu or Debian.


#3

Which flavor of Unix to use on a MacBook Pro?

… OSX


#4

chrome os


#5

[quote=“Moparisthebest, post:2, topic:481777”]I go with something Ubuntu-based on everything I own. You know that you don’t have to re-install when a new ubuntu release comes out right? You just upgrade. I generally find myself using the LTS releases, which are supported for 2 years, unless my hardware can benefit from some new feature in a newer version. Right now all my desktops, media centers, laptops, and servers are running Ubuntu 12.04 LTS. My computers use the Kubuntu variant because I like KDE, but I also really like LXDE which comes with Lubuntu as well, over Xfce (which comes with Xubuntu, if you want that). They are all ubuntu and you can install all the different window managers and choose between them at login if you want.

Arch, being a rolling release, also means it’s not stable. It’s fine if you have the time to fix things after you upgrade now and then, but if you want a stable system, go with Ubuntu or Debian.[/quote]

That is altogether better and preferable to use!!


#6

although I have not tested it, fedora supposedly works great on the MacBook line

I know I am always using fedora or arch if I want something real minimal


#7

osx